A message from Anonymous
Hello, I'm a greek Orthodox girl, living in Australia and my boyfriend is Roman Catholic. We've recently been discussing marriage/children and reached a gridlock when it comes to deciding which religion to baptise children. I'm not sure if I'm in a position to compromise and I don't think he is either, if you have any advice it would be great.

Hello my dear friend,

This is definatelly something you have to discuss with your spiritual father, he’s the one that can tell you how to handle this. So, ask his guidance before taking any decisions about this issue, as, under no circumstances the Orthodox faith of the children cannot be compromised, even if it is for the sake of the love for your future husband.

I hope this helps! I haven’t been in a situation like this, but if I was you, the first thing I’d do it would be to ask my spiritual father.

God bless you, blessed remain of the Lent!

———————————

slavicpride said: Its difficult problem, but you must know that Orthodox faith is one and only!That is all i can say to you.

A message from Anonymous
I am an older adult who is converting to Orthodox. In researching the role of sponsor I was under the impression that this is a very serious, life long relationship. That you will be like family with your sponsor-helping each other over the years,etc. Some people are saying it's no big deal-it's just a person who stands for you at Crismation. This is mixing me up.

Hello dear friend,

First of all, I am sorry for the late reply but I am a little busy currently.

Indeed, the role of the Sponsor (Godparent) in Orthodoxy is really important and it lasts a lifetime. All those who support that his/her role is not serious are misinformed about the teachings of the Orthodox Church concerning it.

Since the introduction of infant Baptism, the Godparent has assumed the important obligation, together with the parents, of ensuring that the infant is brought up within the Orthodox Church and in the life of Christ. It is precisely on account of this obligation that the baptismal sponsor is called the ‘parent-in-God’. The task of steering a child along the narrow path, and bringing them up according to the law of God is perhaps the greatest of all things in life.

St. Theophan the Recluse says that there is no holier act:

While it is an honor to be asked to be a godparent, one should make sure that the potential sponsor will be committed to the responsibility. The role must be honored and not taken lightly. Every godparent will be accountable to God as to whether or not he or she has fulfilled their duties. Prospective godparents must know their faith, or at least be in the process of learning their faith and be committed to a life in Christ. One problem today is that people who are called upon to be godparents do not know their faith and are not regular participants in the life of the Church. This is also true for some parents. Consequently a child who is baptized may never know anything about Jesus Christ and the Church. In the early Church heavy emphasis was placed on the educating of the faithful and those who desired to come into the Christian faith. As Christianity spread in a pagan world, the need to teach individuals before their baptisms became crucial. The systematic instruction, which was a preparatory stage for baptism was and is called “catechism.

You can find out more about the important role of the Godparents in the following links:

Sponsors at Baptism

Godparent (OrthodoxWiki)

The Role of Godparent is an Awesome Responsibility

I hope it helps. God bless you.

Our great responsibility

Christians, have we understood the great responsibility that we have taken on before God through baptism? Have we come to know that we must conduct ourselves as children of God, that we must align our will with the will of God, that we must remain free from sin, that we must love God with all our hearts and always patiently await union with Him? Have we thought about the fact that our heart should be so filled with love that it should overflow to our neighbor? Do we have the feeling that we must become holy and perfect, children of God and heirs of the Kingdom of Heaven? We must struggle for this, so that we may not be shown unworthy and rejected. Let none of us lose our boldness, nor neglect our duties, nor be afraid of the difficulties of spiritual struggle. For we have God as a helper, who strengthens us in the difficult path of virtue.

- St. Nektarius of Aegina

A message from Anonymous
Hello! If you find any information about being a Godparent, can you post it? : )

Hello! Sure :)

The institution of sponsors (god-parents), who serve as witnesses and guarantors for the faith of the person being baptized and are obligated to edify him in the rules of Christian life, has existed since the first century of the Christian era.

It is a rule of the Orthodox Faith that every person, child or adult, should have a Godparent at Baptism. To serve as a Godparent is both a special honor and imposes responsibilities, which last a lifetime. Along with the parents, the Godparent is charged with the responsibility of assisting in the spiritual development of the child. In some cultures the Godparent is addressed by a special name (an example is nouno/nouna in Greek.) Whether a blood relative or not, the Godparent becomes a part of the “spiritual family” of that Godchild.

Since the introduction of infant Baptism, the godparent has assumed the important obligation, together with the parents, of ensuring that the infant is brought up within the Orthodox Church and in the life of Christ. It is precisely on account of this obligation that the baptismal sponsor is called the ‘parent-in-God’. The task of steering a child along the narrow path, and bringing them up according to the law of God is perhaps the greatest of all things in life. St. Theophan the Recluse says that there is no holier act.

While it is an honor to be asked to be a godparent, one should make sure that the potential sponsor will be committed to the responsibility. The role must be honored and not taken lightly. Every godparent will be accountable to God as to whether or not he or she has fulfilled their duties. Prospective godparents must know their faith, or at least be in the process of learning their faith and be committed to a life in Christ. One problem today is that people who are called upon to be godparents do not know their faith and are not regular participants in the life of the Church. This is also true for some parents. Consequently a child who is baptized may never know anything about Jesus Christ and the Church…

About the responsibilities of the Godfather/Godmother, you can check out the following links:

About being a Godparent

Godparenting 101

I lope this helps! God bless you…!

From the Baptism of Jonathan Jackson and his family on Holy Saturday. May God bless them!

From the Baptism of Jonathan Jackson and his family on Holy Saturday. May God bless them!

Repentance is the renewal of baptism

Repentance is the renewal of baptism. Repentance is a contract with God for a second life. A penitent is a buyer of humility. Repentance is constant distrust of bodily comfort. Repentance is self-condemning reflection, and carefree self-care. Repentance is the daughter of hope and the renunciation of despair. A penitent is an undisgraced convict. Repentance is reconciliation with the Lord by the practice of good deeds contrary to the sins. Repentance is purification of conscience. Repentance is the voluntary endurance of all afflictions. A penitent is the inflicter of his own punishments. Repentance is a mighty persecution of the stomach, and a striking of the soul into vigorous awareness.

- St. John Climacus – The Ladder of Divine Ascent

A Muslim is Baptized.

The Muslim

He is Turkish, a ship’s captain and travels all over the world. He is 49 years old and has spent 25 of those at sea and has been in all sorts of difficult situations. He is a clever man and speaks some five languages.

At Sea

This spring his ship was in the Atlantic, when suddenly it broke down. The main engine stopped and the generators packed up.

They drifted for a long time, unable even to send out an SOS. There was nothing to eat or drink and the crew began to get alarmed. Everything they tried ended in failure. Despair set in. There were over thirty in the crew, Georgians, Syrians, Turks and two Ukrainians. Their only hope was in God.

Prayer

The Muslim captain began to pray for help. He also saw how sincerely the Georgian Orthodox prayed. Then he himself turned to Jesus: ‘If Jesus helps me, then I’ll become a Christian’, he decided. The day was not over before the engines came back to life.

(Read the full story here)

The Mystery of Baptism Photographed

A Serbian student by the name of Peter Restovic from Belgrade was an atheist and unbaptized until the age of 19. He found faith and was baptized in Hilandar Monastery on Mount Athos in 1980. A friend of his attended the baptism and took a photograph during the ceremony. They were later amazed and moved to find what looked like a white dove above the head of Peter.

Orthodoxy in Congo

A great quote about Baptism

Orthodox Baptism

"But next time anyone tells you that Baptism is a symbolic ritual, remind them that they are taking this divine gift for granted."

Saint Cyprian of Carthage said..

Flower

"In the baptism of water is received the remission of sins, in the baptism of blood the crown of virtues."

+St. Cyprian of Carthage (3rd c)

Are you saved?

Jesus Christ Blessing

"This is why the modern evangelical Protestant question, "Are you saved?" gives pause to an Orthodox believer. As the subject of salvation is addressed in Scripture, the Orthodox Christian would see it in at least 3 aspects: (a) I have been saved, being joined to Christ in baptism; (b) I am being saved, growing in Christ through the sacramental life of the Church; and (c) I will be saved, by the mercy of God at the Last Judgment.”

— Orthodox Study Bible